Name Changes

How can I change my name?

If you want to change your name, you have three options:

By “Common Law”

  • In order to change your name using this method, you will need to notify all agencies and institutions in writing that your name is changed. This includes Social Security, university registration, driver’s license and car registration, bank accounts, credit cards, leases, employment records, etc. You may have to pay a fee for some of these changes.
  • You also may run into a hassle with some places that won’t process the change without court papers, even though you are not legally required to go through that process. If this happens, you may appeal the decision of the administrative agent within that agency, or you may change your name in court as described below.

By Divorce Decree

  • The court has the authority to grant an order, upon request, allowing a woman or man to resume her or his former name (or maiden name) as part of the divorce process.

By Court Action

  • Changing your name through Access the Law / ASOSU Legal Services takes approximately six weeks.
  • The first visit to the office consists of filling out an intake form so that we may prepare the Petition for Change of Name.
  • The Petition will ask the court for a change of name. You will be responsible for a court filing fee of $105, payable by check to “Access the Law.”
  • When the Petition has been prepared we will have you return to the office to sign the Petition before a notary public. You will need to bring two pieces of ID with you when you come in for your appointment.
  • The attorney will then go to court and file the Petition. They will also post a notice at the courthouse making your Petition for Change of Name public.
  • No sooner than 14 days after filing the Petition, the attorney will return to court to file a second public posting of your name change.
  • Again, no sooner than 14 days after that posting, the attorney will go back to court for a third time and obtain a certified copy of the judgment from the court, and the process will be complete. We usually have you come into the office to pick it up, so it doesn’t get lost in the mail.
  • With a certified copy of the judgment in hand you will now have a new legal name. You can take that certified copy with you to various agencies to so they can legally change your name in your records.